Missile

Coalition Air and Missile Defense: Integration and Interoperability

By Andrea McFeely , Rachel Giachinta , Tyler Milner , Eliahu (Eli) H. Niewood, Sc.D. , Robert Coons , Meg Adams , Moira McCarthy , Dainis Butners

The United States and its partners need systems that share information and data in a direct and timely way. This paper, part of a coalition security series published by MITRE’s National Security Sector, examines a federated approach to integrate assets across the variety of national systems to provide effective capabilities across the coalition.

Download Resources

The United States and its partners need systems that share information and data in a direct and timely way. They need integration and interoperability of command and control (C2) systems as well as weapons for integrated air and missile defense (IAMD). They need shareable modeling and simulation tools to understand the threat, effectiveness of current IAMD, and utility of additional developments and partnerships.

A successful coalition architecture relies on building on and taking advantage of assets within each category in a federated manner rather than attempting to apply a one-solution-fits-all approach. Each nation has its own unique requirements for sovereign defense and deterrence missions that allies and partners seeking to align IAMD must embrace to be successful. While some past approaches have attempted to address IAMD by eliminating the diversity and creating a single system that captured all requirements from all nations, a more efficient system is to embrace the existing diversity and aim to federate and integrate across the variety of national systems to provide effective capabilities across the coalition.

This paper is part of a coalition security series published by MITRE’s National Security Sector to examine options that can help the U.S. more effectively work with allies and partners in competition, deterrence, and conflict.